VIRGIN FUEL OIL (D6)

 

Virgin Fuel Oil (D6): Properties, Applications, and Standards

 

Virgin fuel oil, known as Residual Fuel Oil or D6, is a high-viscosity liquid that plays a crucial role in various industrial applications. Here, we explore the characteristics, applications, and standards associated with this type of fuel oil.

 

1. Characteristics of Virgin Fuel Oil (D6):

 

 

Fuel oil consists of longchain hydrocarbons, particularly alkanescycloalkanes, and aromatics. Small molecules, such as those in Propane, Naphtha, gasoline for cars. Also for aviation jet fuel (kerosene), have relatively low boiling points. They are removed at the start of the fractional distillation process. Heavier petroleum products like diesel fuel and lubricating oil. They are much less volatile and distill out more slowly, while bunker oil is literally the bottom of the barrel. In oil distilling, the only components denser than bunker fuel are carbon black feedstock and bituminous residue (asphalt), which is used for paving roads and sealing roofs.

 

Virgin Fuel Oil D6 is mostly used for generators. Recent changes in fuel quality regulation now require further refining of the D6 in order to remove the sulfur (S), which leads to a higher cost. Despite this recent change, D6 is still less useful because of its viscosity as well as that it needs to be preheated before it can be used and contains high amounts of pollutants, such as sulfur. Since it requires preheating, it cannot be used in small ships or boats or cars. However large ships and power plants can use the residual fuel oil.

 

 

Virgin fuel oil (D6) is a type of residual fuel, mainly used in power plants and larger ships. It is not possible to use it in smaller engines or vessels/vehicles where it is not possible to preheat it. D6 is its name in the USA. In other parts of the world it has other names.

 

Virgin Fuel Oil (D6)

 

Uses:

 

Oil has many uses; it heats homes and businesses and fuels trucksships, and some cars. A small amount of electricity is produced by diesel. It is more polluting and more expensive than natural gas. It is often used as a backup fuel for peaking power plants. In case the supply of natural gas is interrupted or as the main fuel for small electrical generators. In Europe, the use of diesel is generally restricted to cars (about 40%), SUVs (about 90%), and trucks and buses (over 99%). The market for home heating using fuel oil has decreased. This is due to the widespread penetration of natural gas as well as heat pumps.

 

Residual fuel oil is less useful because it is so viscous that it has to be heated with a special heating system. Before use and it may contain relatively high amounts of pollutants, particularly sulfur (S). It forms sulfur dioxide (SO2) upon combustion. However, its undesirable properties make it very cheap. In fact, it is the cheapest liquid fuel available. Since it requires heating before use, residual fuel oil cannot be used in road vehicles. Also in boats or small ships, as the heating equipment takes up valuable space and makes the vehicle heavier. Heating the oil is also a delicate procedure, which is impractical on small, fast moving vehicles. However, power plants and large ships are able to use residual fuel oil.

 

Residual means the material remaining after the more valuable cuts of crude oil have boiled off. The residue may contain various undesirable impurities including 2% water and 1½% percent mineral soil. D6 fuel is also known as residual fuel oil (RFO). D6 fuel is by the Navy specification of Bunker C, or by the Pacific Specification of PS400.

 

Recent changes in fuel quality regulation now require further refining of the D6. In order to remove the sulfur and it leads to a higher cost. Despite this recent change virgin fuel oil D6 is still less useful because of its viscosity. It also needs to be preheated before it can be used. It contains high amounts of pollutants, such as sulfur.

 

The price of D6 Diesel traditionally rises during colder months as demand for heating oil rises. It is refined in much the same way. In many parts of the USA and throughout the UK and Australia, D6 Diesel may be priced higher than petrol.

 

Virgin Fuel Oil (D6)

 

Standards and Classifications of Virgin Fuel Oil:

 

D6 Diesel Standards and Classification CCAI and CII are two indexes which describe the ignition quality of residual fuel oil. The CCAI is especially often calculated for marine fuels. Despite this marine fuels are still quoted on the international bunker markets with their maximum viscosity. It is set by the ISO 8217 standard (see below) due to the fact that marine engines are designed to use different viscosities of fuel.

 

The unit of viscosity used is the Centistokes. The D6 fuel most frequently quoted are listed below in order of cost, the least expensive first:

 

* IFO 380 Intermediate D6 Fuel Oil with a Maximum Viscosity of 380 Centistokes.

* IFO 180 Intermediate D6 Fuel Oil with a Maximum Viscosity of 180 Centistokes.

* LS 380 LowSulphur (<1.5%) Intermediate D6 Fuel Oil with a Maximum Viscosity of 380 Centistokes.

* LS 180 Low–Sulphur (<1.5%) Intermediate D6 Fuel Oil with a Maximum Viscosity of 180 Centistokes.

* MDO Marine Diesel Oil.

*MGO Marine Gasoil.

 

Russia is one of the big producers of D6 Fuel Oil and main refineries in Russia produce this product in large quantities. Russian Virgin Fuel Oil (D6) has a very good quality.

 

Virgin Fuel Oil (D6)

 

Conclusion:

 

Virgin Fuel Oil (D6) remains a vital component in the energy sector, particularly for largescale applications. Its unique characteristics, coupled with challenges such as viscosity and sulfur content, necessitate ongoing refinements to meet evolving regulatory requirements and market demands. Understanding the global standards and classifications is crucial for both suppliers and consumers in navigating the dynamic landscape of the fuel oil industry.

 

Standard Specification Of Russian Virgin Fuel Oil (D6):

 

Standard Specification of Russian Virgin Fuel Oil (D6)